Awarded and Reviewed as a 2014 Notable Video for Children by the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). 

Powerful and emotional, this documentary-style film features children sharing about the loss of a loved one.  A difficult and painful subject is humanized and made accessible through the honesty and bravery of the young people interviewed.


Review from the August 2013 School Library Journal

As this program opens, 10 children ranging in age from four to 14 discuss the loss of someone close to them: a parent, a sibling, an uncle, or a grandparent. Over the course of the video, they respond honestly and bravely to 10 prompts, describing what grief means to hem, how they are coping, and things they wish others, particularly adults, would do to help them heal. One child talks about the failure of a teacher to acknowledge the death of this loved one, but explains how other adults and friends really helped. Production quality is quite good, and the children speak for the most part. Chapter selection is optional. A companion workbook is available on the website (professorchild.com) where there are also links to online resources dealing with grief. A very good addition to a school counseling library.

– Ann Brownson, Easter Illinois University, Charleston


Review from the  June 2013 eNewsletter of Booklist 

Eye-catching gold letters floating against a white screen introduce chapters in this helpful program that explores how 10 youngsters (ages 4 to 14) coped with the death of a loved one. Each child tells his or her story about the death of a parent, uncle, grandfather, or brother. Photographs expand viewers’ understanding of the deceased and other family members. The camera pans still as the respective child earnestly describes particular worries and coping mechanisms. Some tell of dreaming about their relatives and feeling the presence of loved ones during special times or even daily. The issue of religious beliefs is handled nicely; many speak of heaven, but one girl admits she doesn’t know if heaven exists. Feeling overwhelmed is a common refrain, and the message that it’s perfectly OK to cry is conveyed. Concluding with the youngsters’ hopes and dreams, this insightful, well-filmed presentation draws in audiences through the sincerity of the participants and a message of hope.

– Nancy McCray


Review from the  September/October 2013 issue of Video Librarian

This video features 10 children (ages4-to-14) who share their feelings about losing a loved one in a series of interviews that cover several aspects of death. The program is divided into 10 sections, with each child speaking briefly about subjects such as worries and challenges related to grief, and strategies for coping. Their stories cover a wide range of feelings: one boy talks about how he worried that he wouldn’t get new clothes anymore because his mom used to buy them for him, while a toddler remembers having fun putting clips in her daddy’s hair. The kids offer advice and thoughts about their own experiences adjusting to life without someone they love. Most of the subjects here have lost family members–particularly parents–to illness. Interviews with a boy whose brother died in a traffic accident and girl who talks about a grandfather who passed away from natural causes offer useful perspectives on significantly different situations. All of the kids share a photo of the person they are discussing, personal details about how they celebrate the memory of that individual, and comments about their own dreams for the future. A powerful program that could help encourage hope and healing in other youngsters suffering from loss and sadness, this is highly recommended.

– K. Curver


Review from the March/April 2014 issue of Well Being Journal

This DVD explores the issues surrounding grief, as well as factors that can help a person, especially a child, move through it. Children tell their stories of losing a loved one in this ne DVD titled Children and Grief.  Viewers hear about their grief and loss, and how they are coping and healing. These children have experienced a life-changing event, yet they manage to tell their stories with a sense of strength and resilience. Their advice for other children who have lost a loved one is honest, sincere, and heartfelt. One boy used his cat as a sounding board; talking to it and being alone with it helped him deal with his feelings. Others had their own ways of coping or processing, including sleeping, playing video games, remembering or looking at photos of good times together, talking about their loss with friends, and playing with a dog or puppy. Their advice to others who have experienced the death of a loved one: Let it out– talk with others about your loss and tell them how you feel; it’s ok to cry because it gets the sadness out of you’ it can be hard sometimes, but don’t worry, just be happy “the way you usually were”; and, “remember often that someone can be in your life one day and gone the next.”

 


Review from Barbara a counselor and character coach from the blog www.corneroncharacter.blogspot.com

A Big Find for Small Groups

“One of my favorite days this summer was when Heather, who was in second grade when I started working at Westwood-Bales, came to see me after her first year of college. This little girl always had a special place in my heart because when she was in third grade, she wrote me a note asking to see me, just because.

She didn’t have a problem to discuss, or some unresolved feelings to process; she just wanted to spend some time with me.

We had such a nice visit that day (and a couple times after that!); it was refreshing to talk with someone who didn’t really have any pressing issues to work out. Not that year, anyway. The following spring break, she lost her mom in a boating accident. I kept track of her over the years and always wondered what it was like to walk in her shoes and recover from such a devastating loss. I’ve admired her resilience from afar and it warmed my heart to see the beautiful young lady she’s become as we chatted over lunch.

I’ve been thinking about Heather all day since I watched this Children and Grief Professor Child product, the perfect complement for my small group counseling classes!

I am just jazzed about these films and their free downloadable workbook companions. What a valuable resource. But you don’t have to take my word for it; check out this You Tube trailer and listen for yourselves to these amazing survivors:

There is absolutely nothing that can replace first-hand experience; that’s why I see so much connection potential with these real children sharing their real stories. Each DVD includes about ten chapters, perfect for a semester-long small group, or for showing a chapter at a time as your students are ready. Follow-up with the engaging enrichment ideas in the workbook. There are reflection writing activities, role-plays, and drawing exercises. The one that caught my eye in the Grief workbook was a Dear-Abby-type writing exercise that puts the child in the role of the expert, writing the answers for his/her advice column. What a clever way to get kids to express themselves and share the wisdom from their journey.

So often when someone dies, it becomes the elephant in the room that no one wants to talk about. These films, which also include one for Children of Divorce, for Children of Military families, and for Siblings And Autism, can change all of that. They will give students a voice and feelings an outlet. They will validate and normalize behaviors. And they will undoubtedly help countless children heal.

Now I can’t wait for my small groups to start!”


Review from Marissa Rex an elementary school counselor from the blog www.ElementarySchoolCounseling.org 

Last night, I watched two fabulous educational films from Professor Child, a company created by three mothers, Rory Kidder, Jenni O’Keefe, and Sharon Richards. The mission of Professor Child is to empower children during difficult life events. As the founders explain, “children have a powerful voice that is relatable, healing and hopeful. Ultimately, we want children to know they are not alone in what they are experiencing and that much can be learned by simply listening to another child’s story” (Professor Child, About Us).

Their documentary-style films feature a variety of children who have all experienced a specific topic. The children share their stories, what has helped, what they wish for, advice for other kids, and more.

As an added bonus, each film comes with a free companion workbook to provide opportunities for further discussion and reflection.

Children and Grief 
 – In this film, children share their stories of losing a loved one. Some kids are dealing with the loss of a parent, while others with a sibling, uncle, or grandparent. Each child’s experience and response to death is different, which allows the viewer to see a little of him or herself in the film. This is crucial because many children (and even adults) feel alone as they manage their grief; it is an incredibly private, yet universal, experience.

While not particularly “sad” in an over-indulgent sort of way, still be prepared to have strong emotions come to the surface as you listen to the heartfelt stories.

A+
 Children and Divorce
 – This film, while similar in structure, has a different sort of feel. There is not a huge variety of experiences or ethnicities as we see in “Children and Grief,” but the stories are still meaningful and quite helpful.

The children in this film describe their personal experiences with divorce, what it means to them, how it has changed their lives, what has helped, and more. I especially enjoyed hearing the advice that the kids gave, which could have a tremendously positive impact on children at various stages of the divorce process. A

Why You Should Purchase Your Own Copies:
 As school counselors, we are responsible for helping children cope with a variety of difficult circumstances. It can be a challenge to start a group about grief or divorce. Maybe the group dynamics, personality wise, are off. Maybe you don’t have enough students in a particular grade level to start a group and therefore, cannot offer this service. Maybe students who could join the group feel uncomfortable speaking about their situation in front of others and would prefer individual counseling. So, what can you do to help students dealing with divorce or grief know that they are not alone? Well, I think these films are a wonderful resource to fit this particular need.

You could show the film based on the chapters that best address your students’ needs or use the chapters for different group sessions as an introduction to the day’s lesson.

Also, you can look forward to future films from Professor Child called “Siblings and Autism” and “Children of Military Families.”

To purchase one or both of these films (“Children and Grief” and “Children and Divorce”), visit Professor Child online. You can order a DVD or a digital copy. Plus, you can download both companion workbooks for FREE. I strongly recommend these resources for your elementary school counseling practice. Check them out today!


Review from Vicky Brinius a counselor on her blog www.dealsharingaunt.blogspot.com

My dad died  years ago, and for awhile I was messed up. I saw him die right in front of me, and my niece and nephew were seeing him everyday, as was I. It was hard on all of us. The kids are almost 6 + 7 now and they do not talk about him like the used to. I think that they are missing out, but I don’t want to upset them either. This dvd was a great opportunity to start discussing death and grief. What I liked best was that we went at our own pace and took it slow. I also really liked the companion workbook and exercises! They helped me to see how much the kids understood!


Review from Sabrina Dix from the blog www.couponwahm.com

I love a company who’s primary focus is on helping children.I accepted a opportunity to review the Professor Child’s Children & Grief film. The film was very informative not only from an adult standpoint but from a child’s as well. My son was really able to relate to the children in the film in many ways.

In Children and Grief, ten brave children share their stories of losing a loved one.You hear about their grief and loss, how they are coping and healing. Their advice for other children who have lost a loved one is honest, sincere and heartfelt. These children have experienced a life-changing event, yet they manage to share their stories with a sense of strength and resiliency. You will be left with a sense of hope and a better understanding of death after watching this film.

You can watch this video for a taste of what you can expect from the Children & Grief Film.The film is available in digital download or DVD and comes with a free downloadable companion workbook for $34.99.

They also have a resources for children of divorcesiblings with autism, and military children.


Review from Elizabeth Towns from the blog www.31daysearlyirise.com

Our young people face loss at a greater rate in this millennium than ever before in our history. It’s so important that we help them process where death belongs in the circle of life. This has always been important to me, causing me to research and find many ways to talk to my children about death and grief and the process of moving through grief.

It’s very difficult to talk to very young children about these issues, but also very important to include them in the dialogue. I was impressed when I got the chance to view Professor Child’s Children & Grief educational video for children experiencing challenging life events.

The children in this video speak candidly about their experience with death, and with the grief they experience. These children, as young as 8 years of age, I believe, speak of the loss they have endured and how they relate those losses to their own lives, present and future. They are kids talking to kids, and I can’t think of any better way to help my own children deal with grief.

I have in my home a section of books that deal with grief at several age levels. This is the only video that is a part of that selection. It came at an opportune time in our lives, as my great-niece had birthed a son who lived only a short while after his birth. She has three living children who spent a day with me, and with her permission, we read the books and watched Professor Child’s Children & Grief. We talked, we cried, and we talked more. Even over the next few days, we talked.


Review from Chelle Thompson from the blog www.armywifeandmommy.com

This is a great way to help your child(ren) or students learn positive and productive ways to cope with grief. It will help them to realize that they aren’t alone and that other children have also gone through what they are going through.  I think the children will relate more to the video because it features children of various ages who have lost loved ones in different ways (disease, accident, suicide, etc). I would definitely utilize this film if or when my own children experience a loss and highly recommend it for anyone looking for a way to help a child or children deal with their own grief and loss.


Review from Kim Croisant on the blog www.mommieagain.com

When I saw this review on grief come up on Tomoson I immediately applied as this is a subject that is well-known to me and my heart. Having gone through grieving myself, this film WILL do children good. Every feeling these kids have is spot on. Parents – if you can’t find the right words to say, let this film help. These kids on this film are real with real touching stories. These children show their courageousness despite going through the loss of someone they loved. It’s true, children can teach other children. We see it all the time, don’t we?

No matter if your child is grieving now or perhaps later in life when they find out the true story of their loss, this film can help them get through the hard times and the sad times. There is no time limit on grieving and no one said it had to be done by a certain time…and by no means is a year long enough! My grieving story (or lack of) is different from these kids’ story. Perhaps one day this DVD will come in handy for me to share with my grand kids. Until then, I will finish watching it, then tuck it away for later. Thank you Professor Child – you got it right!!


Review from Stephanie Mago-Eagle from the blog www.stephaniesbitbybit.com

Sometimes we all have have a bad day and other times we have more extreme days and months and years. In 2010  within 5 months, I gave birth to my daughter Amelia, then 7 days later my husband had turned 40 and then we lost her daddy/my husband 16 1/2 days after Amelia was born, her grandfather the next month and then her Great-Great Aunt Pearl 5 months later. My daughter is just now in the past few months noticing the loss of her daddy. I do not know how to help her with these losses because I also experienced these losses to. I feel helpless when I see her cry out “Daddy” and he is not here with her or I. It is very obvious my little girl need someone that understands and can walk her through this and help her with what she is going through with these losses in her young life and that is when I came across Professor Child for my little girl.

Children & Grief is the production of Professor Child, developer or educational tools for children experiencing challenging life events.

Professor Child’s educational philosophy is one of children teaching children. The films are unscripted and the children’s stories are purely their own. Professor Child is the creation of three mothers coming together with a fundamental belief in empowering children. Professor Child believes that children have a powerful voice that is relatable, healing and hopeful. Ultimately, They want children to know they are not alone in what they are experiencing and that much can be learned by simply listening to another child’s story.

Children and Grief is a documentary-style film available for download or on DVD. Comes with an accompanying workbook that is free to downloadChildren and Grief  movie highlights personal stories of children who have experienced grieving in their own way and their stories offer advice,hope, and relatable messages for any child going through a similar event.There is no age limit on the Children and Grief video, except I have to say that it was something my 34 month old does not quit understand yet what the children are talking about in this movie.But when she is a little older and can understand a little more I will have her watch again.

In Children and Grief,  10 brave children share their stories of losing a loved one. Your child or children listens and watches as they describe their stories of grief and loss. Also how they are coping and healing from those losses. The children advice for other children who have lost a loved one is very honest,very sincere and very heartfelt. These children have experienced a life-changing event,but they manage to share their stories with a strength and a resiliency. Your children after watching leave with a hope and an understanding that “I am not alone in experiencing death.”

In the 40 minute film it covers many different aspects of grief including:

  •  My Story
  •  What Grief Means To Me
  •  Worries and Challenges
  •  What Has Helped
  •   Advice
  •   Life After Death
  •   Celebrate and Remember
  •    What I’ve Learned
  •    Hopes and Dreams
  •    I AM

The Children and Grief workbook features over 40 pages of discussion questions and also creative exercises.Ten chapters of the workbook correspond with the ten film chapters. Like in all of the Professor Child workbooks, it is a very extensive workbook that covers various aspects of grief and is a very powerful tool to help your child or children work through the grief process.

The Children and Grief workbook is to help children continue to heal by expressing their feelings through discussions and creative activities. Many of these activities will help adults struggling with grief also. My daughter is just way to young to do this workbook.

The “My Story” workbook challenge is a lot harder then the other workbook. The wonderful thing about Professor Child they structure their materials so you are able to skip over a exercise without missing out on anything.

If you have a little child like I do,they may really benefit from “What Grief Means to Me”. In this exercise it asks for the child to choose an animal to represent their grief.

In the “Worries and Challenges” activity. The child or children are given a project where they can make their own clay beads and create a necklace out of them. With each whole that they punch out in a bead they can imagine another concern they might have and as the necklace bakes to set beads in the oven they can visualize all those concerns floating away. It is very simple but is effective.

The little boy named Dominic in the movie said he found himself sleeping a lot and playing video games to help him cope with things.In “What has Helped” the child or children can write thank you’s or other kinds of letter’s to their loved ones that have passed away.

The “Advice” chapter is personal for kids.They can do this one on their own. This one can help your child/children feel like there are other people out there that feel like they did. It is nice that children don’t have to feel like they are alone in their grief.In the section children can feel like they are able to tell adults what they need and this will help me understand what I need to do for my little girl when the time comes,and this will be such a blessing at that time.

In “Life after Death” helps children understand what happens when you die. In the afterlife game  you act out a scenario about what your departed loved one might be doing right now, this will be a great way to teach my little girl about religious and spiritual beliefs that her daddy had and I have.

The “Celebrate and Remember” chapter is great and I love it. This is to find new ways every day to  remember and to memorialize and celebrate the lives of your loved ones that have passed away. 

We Give Professor Child 5 Stars

We still miss our loved ones very much. This is not a end all to ones grief,but it is a tool to use help  you and your child/children get through the process of your grief. If any of you have lost a loved one, I would highly recommend visiting the Professor Child website for information on materials they can very much offer you the help you need to get through a difficult time.


Review from Tracee Bass from the blog http://ltsteelswife.blogspot.com/  

This video is not just a documentary. It is children speaking to children about how grief has effected them.

Some of the children have lost a dad. Some have log siblings. Some have lost grandparents. But each one grieving in their own way.

Have your children lost someone and you didn’t know how to tell them? Or you told them and it was just too over their heads? This can happen. We are grieving along with them. Sometimes we don’t remember that our kids are young and need us to be there for them. I truly believe that sometimes kids learn better from other kids than they do from adults. But each child is different and each grieving process is different.

If your child is grieving I would sit them down and watch this with them. This is a 40 minute video or courageous children telling you their story. This is good for grades K-12 to watch. It costs $34.99 for the film and they have a free workbook that includes over 40 pages of exercises that go with the film. You can go to www.professorchild.com

I loved that almost every child spoke about their family member going to Heaven or being in Heaven. That really speaks to me that this film is great for our child library. I think I will be donating it to them after I write this review.


Review from Jenn O’Neill from the blog http://www.organic-mama.ca  

We’ve all been there, forced to say our final goodbyes to someone we know and love.  And as adults it’s often a time for confusion, anger and sadness – but how do you think a child would feel losing someone they love? Children and Grief is a beautiful film surrounding the lives of ten brave children who share their stories of losing a loved one.

The film is exactly what any child facing the loss of a loved one needs to watch.  Not only do the children in the film discuss their grief over losing someone, but they also share how they are coping and even healing in the aftermath. What these children share with the viewers is real – and the advice they give is very valuable to children aged 4-17.

The film leaves its viewers with a sense of hope and greater understanding of what they’re feeling. It puts into words what we as parents would struggle to say. Plus we all know how children’s words have the ability to resonate with our children more-so than our own words sometimes can. For just that reason alone, I find this to be a valuable resource for any family to have.

This film is designed to be viewed one or two chapters at a time, opposed to the entire film at once. This allows parents to open up the lines of communication with their child and reflect on the film as well as real life. ProfessorChild.com even has a wonderful (and free) companion workbook to download on their site. It boasts various exercises that correspond with the film in case you’re at a loss for words, yourself.

The film is reasonably priced at just $34.99 and is available for purchase at ProfessorChild.com.  Parents, prepare yourself and your children for the unthinkable by purchasing a copy right now.  You’ll be thankful you did.


 

Review from DJ Harris from the http://dj6ual.jigsy.com/blog

CHILDREN TEACHING CHILDREN ABOUT GRIEF

A Professor Child Production

Sometimes you have a bad day and other times you have a _catastrophic_ year! In a span of six months my children lost their great-grandfather, their grandfather, the family dog, and their grandma’s cat. My kids were suffering, as well they should, but I was in no place to help them because I had experienced a tragedy of my own. I felt helpless as I watched them spiraling farther and farther down a pit of despair. It was obvious my little ones and older ones need someone, or something, and so I found them Professor Child.

PROFESSOR CHILD BELIEVES IN THE POWER OF CHILDREN TEACHING CHILDREN. They provide grieving children and their families with educational films and workbooks that aren’t condescending or scripted. It is real children with real stories talking to your kids about the same issues that they themselves are dealing with. It is perfect for children focusing on challenging events that may arise in their life.

Children and Grief is a documentary-style film available for download or on DVD and comes with an accompanying workbook that is FREE to download [1]. The movie highlights personal stories of children who have experienced grieving in their own way and their stories offer advice, hope, and relatable messages for any child going through a similar event. I wouldn’t put an age limit on the Children and Grief video, except to say that it was obvious that my thirteen year old son got more out of it than my twenty-two year old son or three year old grandson. Both my sons benefited equally from the workbook exercises though.

In Children and Grief [2], ten brave children share their stories of losing a loved one. Your child listens as they describe their stories of grief and loss as well as how they are coping and healing. Their advice for other children who have lost a loved one is honest, sincere and heartfelt. These children have experienced a life-changing event, yet they manage to share their stories with a sense of strength and resiliency. Your kids are left with a sense of hope and an understanding that they are not alone in experiencing death.

This 40 minute film covers many aspects of grief including:

– My Story

– What Grief Means To Me

– Worries and Challenges

– What Has Helped

– Advice

– Life After Death

– Celebrate and Remember

– What I’ve Learned

– Hopes and Dreams

– I AM

The Children and Grief workbook features over 40 pages of thought provoking discussion questions and creative exercises. The ten chapters of the workbook correspond with the ten film chapters. Like all Professor Child workbooks, this extensive workbook covers various aspects of grief and will be a powerful tool to help your child work through the grief process.

The Children and Grief workbook is meant to help children continue to heal by expressing their feelings through discussions and creative activities. Many of the activities will help adults struggling as well. My two sons and I all did the workbook, but my grandson didn’t do the workbook because he just couldn’t grasp the concepts.

The “My Story” workbook challenge was harder for my younger son then my oldest. He just couldn’t figure out what to do. The wonderful thing about the way Professor Child structures their materials is that he was able to skip over the exercise without missing out.

My youngest really benefited from “What Grief Means to Me”. The exercise asks for the child to choose an animal to represent their grief. My son took this very seriously. He spent hours thumbing through wildlife books and reading webpages to find just the right one. He even used his allowance to buy a totem to represent his animal, but that’s another story.

I had a very hard time being involved in the “Worries and Challenges” activity with my kids. Guilt and my own grieving kept me from participating. I think it did a lot for them though. They are given a project where they make their own clay beads and create a necklace out of them. With each whole they punch in a bead they imagine another concern they might have and as they bake to set beads in the oven they visualize all those concerns floating away. It is so simple and yet so effective.

Both my kids related to Dominic the most in the movie. They too found the sleeping a lot and playing video games helped them cope with things. In “What has Helped” they wrote thank you’s to their grandmother for taking them shopping for video games and musical instruments.

The “Advice” chapter was very personal for my kids. They did that on their own. They did say they really learned a lot from it and it helped them feel like there were other people out there that felt like they did. It is nice to know they don’t feel like they are alone. The section where they were able to tell adults what they needed helped me understand what I could do for them, and that took a huge weight off my shoulders.

In “Life after Death” I was astounded by just how little my youngest child knew about my own beliefs about what happens when you die [3]. When we played the afterlife game, this is where you act out a scenario about what your departed loved one might be doing right now, it became apparent we needed to share more about religious and spiritual beliefs.

We all loved the “Celebrate and Remember” chapter. We find new ways every day to celebrate and remember our loved ones.

When going through the workbook with my kids I found the last chapter, “I AM”, to be my favorite project. It was equally helpful for both my thirteen year old and myself. I would encourage you to print out a copy for you and your child. The basic premise of the exercise involves asking your children to fill it out with items that represent who they are, what they love, and what brings them joy. It may surprise you! So while you are at it, fill one out for yourself too. That may surprise you more!

My kids and me still miss our loved one very much. This is not a cure all by any means, but it sure does help get through the process with a spoon full of sugar. If you have lost a loved one, I would highly recommend visiting the Professor Child website for information on materials they might offer to help you through your difficult time. Thank you.

Also from Professor Child..

Children and Divorce

Children and Divorce is a one-of-a-kind video for children being affected by divorce. The film focuses on the child’s perspective and is helpful for any child looking for a way to relate to or work through the pain of divorce.

In Children and Divorce, eight children come together to share their personal divorce stories. Their stories are unique, yet universal. They describe what divorce means to them, how it has changed their lives, what has helped, what they love most about their families, and much more. Through their journey we hear that divorce is a part of their lives, but does not define them. They get to choose who they are in the end. These children are honest, brave and courageous in their storytelling and will leave you with a feeling of hope.

Siblings and Autism

Siblings of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder share their personal stories. We will learn what ASD means to them, what it is like to be a sibling to someone with ASD, what their experience has taught them, what has helped, how it has affected their friendships, and much more.

Children of Military Families

Children will share their personal stories of what it is like to have a parent in the military serving over-seas. Stories focus on deployment, a parents’ return and advice for other children.


Review from Marianne Sandling from the blog www.sandlingallday.blogspot.com  

This is a basic question that you NEVER think to ask yourself, UNTIL you need to…

It’s not a thought that people say, oh, I should know how to help my child deal with grief!

When my brother in law, Lennie, passed away last January VERY unexpectedly, it shocked the entire family to it’s core… more than you could EVER know. Lennie was like glue… he stuck on you hard, and you loved him for it. He WAS my brother… forget the inlaw, he WAS my big brother. He used to call us and say, “I just wanted to hear your voice”. He’d say “I love you baby sis” That’s what he called me… baby sis… because he was the youngest in the family, and now, I was!

I had a chance to do a review on Children Teaching Children About Grief and thought it would be a great opportunity.

I was right. Children Teaching Children About Grief is an amazing tool for a child, and adult! I let my son watch a little of it, I didn’t want to overwhelm him, and he said that he was sad for the child, but glad it wasn’t him. Typical response for him, he’s very sensitive to other’s emotions.

Watching it myself, I was overwhelmed at the strength and poise in some of these children… I lost my own father at a young age, so I have a unique perspective on the subject.

I would suggest this to anyone who’s going through, or (in the event of terminally sick relatives) will be dealing with it soon.


Review from Ann Williams from the blog www.anniam.com

Children Teaching Children about Grief,_ produced by Professor Child, is a DVD that approaches the topic of grief with ten children who have lost a loved one. We learn the stories of these lovely children in their own words, along with their fears, challenges, advice and hope for the future.

There are 10 chapters on the DVD:

* My Story

* What Grief Means

* Worries and Challenges

* What has Helped

* Advice

* Life After Death

* Celebrate and Remember

* What I Have Learned

* Hopes and Dreams

* I Am

These chapters could be played one at a time, allowing for time to ponder on the topic and share feelings.

The DVD is well made and graphically pleasing. The children include both boys and girls of various ages, probably between the ages of 5 and 14, who share their experience in their own words. They express the fears they had along the way, ways that they coped and demonstrate their resiliency and hope for the future. They reassure viewers that it is “okay to cry” and “okay to feel sad” and most importantly “okay to feel whatever you want.”

I feel that children who are experiencing loss could easily relate to the children in the video. I think it would help them to realize that they are not alone and that their feelings are okay. I even think they would be more apt to listen to the advice the children in the video give more readily than listening to a counselor or other adult. Children relate to children more easily than adults.

This video can be purchased at www.professorchild.com [1] in either DVD or digital download format. Both also come with a free companion workbook with many discussion questions and creative companion exercises for the DVD. The 48-page workbook has excellent activities for children working through grief. Some activities are geared towards younger children, some older and some that would easily be appropriate for both.

This is a great resource for teachers, school counselors or counselors working with children and grief. Quite honestly, I think it would also be a nice resource for parents to use with their own children.